Archive for November, 2011


Workout on the Go!

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The holiday season is here and many of you may be traveling. Don’t let travel stop your workout! Here is a workout you can do when you’re “on the go”. No weights or gym required.  Always make fitness a priority and you’ll see how easily it becomes second nature.

(FitnessRX)

30 Seconds Each exercise:

1)    High knees

2)    Squat jumps

3)    Jump lunges

4)    Side to side boxer twists

5)    Jump rope (you don’t even need an actual rope, use an invisible one!) 
6)    Burpees

Go straight into:

1)    25 pushups

2)    50 walking lunges (you grab something heavy that’s around you and hold it overhead for these)

3)    2 minutes of your choice of abs

Repeat 4-5 times

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Do you know that the average Thanksgiving dinner has over 2000 calories? It can be a real challenge if you are watching your waistline. The following are some eating tips so that you can still look good and be healthy after the Thanksgiving dinner without having to deprive yourself.

1.Consider eating more slowly and you might consume less. Slow down and savor and enjoy your food more.

2.Put down the fork between bites and take time to have a conversation and linger over the meal.

3. After you have eaten an amount of food that should be satisfying, you may want to wait 15 to 20 minutes before deciding if you are still hungry.

4. Don’t go to the Thanksgiving dinner hungry.  Eat a wholesome breakfast and a light snack before going to dinner. We often eat faster and more when we are hungry.

5. Watch your portion size when eating side dishes. Go for smaller portions. This way you can sample all the different foods.

6. Drink plenty of water to help fill up your stomach and keep you hydrated.

7.Thanksgiving dinner is not an all-you-can-eat buffet…

Moderation is always the key!

 Happy Thanksgiving

Ever wonder what the worst foods are to eat? Here are the 5 absolute worst foods that you could ever put into your body based on nutritional content. The winners are:

(taken from Readerdigest.com and daveywaveyfitness.com)

  1. Soda. Soda is loaded with calories, steeped in sugar, overflowing with artificial ingredients – and without any nutritional benefit. Soda is the ultimate example of “empty calories.” Just how much sugar is in a can of soda? About 40 grams – the equivalent of TEN packets of sugar! Yet the average American drinks 51 gallons of soft drinks each year. If we could cut that number in half (and replace the 25.5 gallons of soda with water), it would add up to more than 30,000 calories (the equivalent of 8.7 pounds of fat). It would take 57 hours on the treadmill to have the same effect.
  2. French fries. Once potatoes are deep fried, their trans fat content goes through the roof. Avoid this gastrointestinal disaster at all costs! Opt for a salad, some rice – or pretty much anything else on the menu (and whatever you do, don’t smother them in cheese and ranch dressing).
  3. Chips. Traditional potato or corn chips face the same trans fat issues as french fries. Fortunately, the times are changing and some companies are making healthier alternatives – even baked chips. I do my best to substitute chips with carrot sticks; you get the same crunch but without the heart disease and clogged arteries.
  4. Mozzarella sticks. “Mozzarella sticks” is just another way of saying “fat fried in fat.” Cheese isfull of fat. Deep fried, it’s even worse. Sure, there is some calcium in the cheese (and Mozzarella cheese is one of the lighter cheeses), but you’re much better off eating some spinach or yogurt to get the same calcium intake.
  5. Doughnuts. What’s worse than starting your day with a bowl full of sugary cereal? Reaching for a doughnut. High in trans fat and sugar, doughnuts are a true artery clogger devoid of nutritional benefit. Yet the average American consumes 35 doughnuts each year! Doughnuts are the one food that you will NEVER catch me eating – I just can’t justify it!
  6. Ice cream. I love ice cream, and it pains me to include it on this list. But did you know that a serving of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream can contain as much as 30 grams of fat? And who eats just one serving (half a cup)?! There is no saving grace for ice cream, save some calcium. Timing also comes into play – most of us eat ice cream just before bed, which is obviously the worst time possible.
Some of the runner ups are…
Processed meat (ie hot dogs)
frozen meals
low-fat foods
margarine